Call for Assistance Device

Safety should not only include the security of employees on-site, but also off-site.

A hazard to an employee’s safety should be considered in every line of work, duty and location.

The below example shows how one site cared for the safety of workers using a call for assistance device:

  • Monitored GPS units were carried by Residient Liason Officer’s (RLO) and included a call for assistance button;
  • A monitoring station listened to the call for assistance and decided whether to send emergency services;
  • In one instance, an RLO was recently threatened by a resident and police were on-site within minutes;
  • The workforce were also permitted to carry/ use these units outside of work times for personal safety.

Footer Reference

Monitor report. Keepmoat Regeneration. London. April 2016


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