Hybrid Concrete Truck Emission Reductions 1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5

It is important to recognise that a site’s environmental impact goes well beyond the site boundary. A significant environmental impact of construction is in the production of the materials used, but it is also important to consider the impact of their transportation at both a local and wider level.

Although concrete batching plants are often in reasonably close proximity to sites, the volume of concrete required on high-rise construction for example can lead to a considerable local air quality impact if not properly managed. A study carried out by researchers at King’s College London suggests that nearly 9,500 people die early each year in London due to long-term exposure to air pollution. A similar study by the Royal College of Physicians indicates that this figure could be as high as 40,000 for the whole of the UK.

On Canary Wharf Contractor’s Newfoundland residential development the team partnered with concrete trade contractor, Expanded, to trial the use of hybrid concrete wagons from their supplier, Hanson. The anticipation is that with the wider adoption of hybrid technologies within the construction industry there would be a wide variety of stakeholder benefits from localised air quality improvements, to fuel and associated cost efficiencies for the operator.

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Entry submitted by Canary Wharf Contractors


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