worker fatigue

Spotlight on… worker fatigue aims to raise awareness of the health and safety risks associated with fatigue and provides the industry with guidance for addressing this issue…

read more

The campaign

‘Spotlight on… worker fatigue’ aims to raise awareness of the health and safety risks associated with fatigue and provides the industry with guidance for addressing this issue.

Worker fatigue is an often overlooked workplace hazard in the construction industry. This is despite the fact that fatigue is a serious health and safety risk in construction, as it has the potential to severely impact an operative’s physical and cognitive capacities. The inability to respond and react promptly can be detrimental on a construction site, leading to errors and near misses, injuries and even fatalities. It is important then that the construction industry recognises the dangers associated with fatigue, its causes and how to prevent it.

What is worker fatigue?

Fatigue is more than simply feeling tired, it is an overwhelming and ongoing state of mental and/or physical exhaustion. Construction workers are at a much greater risk of fatigue due to the nature of the working conditions, shift patterns and types of labour involved in the industry. Therefore, it is imperative that fatigue is addressed like any other workplace hazard through risk assessment and management.

The following statistics identify the severity of fatigue in the UK:

  • Sleep deprivation costs the UK around £40 billion every year.
  • More than one third of the UK gets less than six hours sleep every night.
  • If everyone in the UK had between 6-7 hours sleep every night, this could add around £24 billion to the economy.
  • In the UK, 1 in 5 visits to the GP are related to tiredness and fatigue.
  • Fatigue costs the UK between £115 and £240 million per year in workplace accidents alone.
  • UK employees work the longest hours in Europe, but are significantly less productive.
  • Over 50% of UK employees have experienced burnout at work.
  • Almost two thirds of UK employees claim tiredness affects their productivity at work.
  • 86% of UK employees feel unable to speak with their line manager about how tiredness impacts their performance at work.

More specifically, worker fatigue is a huge concern for the construction industry:

  • The UK construction industry has one of the highest rates of psychosocial health problems, including fatigue and burnout.
  • The UK construction industry ranks third for the highest average hours worked per week.
  • Over 80% of construction workers in the UK are not getting enough sleep.
  • Only 14% of construction workers in the UK work fewer than 40 hours a week.
  • 44% of construction workers in the UK travel around 2-3 hours a day to work and back.
  • Long working hours have been identified as the most significant contributor to poor mental health within the UK construction industry.

Worker fatigue in construction

The inherent nature of the construction industry can increase the risk of fatigue. Common causes of fatigue in construction include long working hours, consecutive shifts, irregular working schedules, night work, early starts, demanding workloads, challenging working conditions and inadequate breaks. These factors can prove draining and can intensify feelings of fatigue and exhaustion.

Construction workers operate in an environment where they are challenged both mentally and physically. Construction work entails the regular use of heavy equipment and machinery as well as hazards which can be physically demanding, while the repetitive and monotonous nature of certain tasks requires focus and concentration which can also exacerbate fatigue. Such labour is often performed in harsh working conditions, including extreme temperatures, excessive noise and vibration and poor visibility, all of which can provoke fatigue.

Operating whilst fatigued is a serious health and safety risk and can be as dangerous as working under the influence of drugs and alcohol. In fact, being awake for around 17 hours stimulates impairment equivalent to exceeding the drink drive limit. Such impairment includes slower reactions, lapses in judgement, reduced concentration and coordination, an underestimation of risk and diminished cognitive ability. In an industry fraught with safety hazards and high risk activities, it is vital that operatives are mentally and physically alert at all times.

Fatigue is not only detrimental to the health and safety of the workforce, but to the prosperity of business. Fatigue can lead to poor work performance, reduced productivity, slower progress and delays. Tackling fatigue not only improves health and safety, but is financially beneficial, by reducing absenteeism and presenteeism, decreasing lost-time incidents, reducing the risk of accidents, and improving workplace efficiency.

The Considerate Constructors Scheme

The Scheme’s Code of Considerate Practice states that all registered sites, companies and suppliers are expected to provide a supportive and caring working environment. The Checklist used by the Scheme Monitors asks the following questions: ‘Does the site encourage attitudes and behaviours that enhance safety performance?’, ‘Does the site care for the health and wellbeing of the workforce?’ and ‘How is the health and wellbeing of the workforce assessed and addressed?’

To support this campaign, the Scheme surveyed over 1000 construction industry professionals to gauge attitudes on the topic of worker fatigue. Key findings include:

  • 75% of respondents think that worker fatigue is a problem within the construction industry.
  • 73% think that it is an overlooked hazard and 65% do not think the industry is doing enough to prevent it.
  • 49% work on average between 40-50 hours per week, whilst 37% work more than 50.
  • When asked what the main causes of worker fatigue were: 34% said working hours, 20% said workload whilst on shift, and 18% said early starts.
  • 54% sometimes feel overburdened at work, whilst 30% frequently do.
  • Only 5% have a thorough understanding of the regulations surrounding fatigue and 50% claimed to have little understanding.
  • 18% do not feel that they could speak to site management if they were feeling fatigued.
  • When asked what the industry could do to prevent worker fatigue: the majority of respondents suggested a restriction on working hours.

Considerate Constructors Scheme Chief Executive, Amanda Long  said:

“Our workforce is at the centre of the success of our industry and, as the industry survey clearly shows, we must do more to improve standards to tackle the issue of worker fatigue.

“The Scheme is at the centre of raising awareness and spreading best practice across the entire industry and I would encourage everyone to read the Campaign and utilise the resources available within it.

“Thank you to all organisations which have contributed to the Campaign so far, and we look forward to continuing to grow the Best Practice Hub’s suite of resources on this critical subject to help to continue to raise standards across our industry.”

It is evident that there is still more work to do if the industry is to tackle the issue of worker fatigue. The following sections of the campaign showcase examples of best practice and in-depth case studies, while the resources section brings together organisations that are addressing the issue of fatigue in the construction industry.

 

 

Law and legislation

Click for more

Law and legislation

Worker fatigue is often included within the larger topic of workplace health and safety. The following legislation establishes policies and regulations which have been put in place to prevent worker fatigue.

Click for more

External resources

Click for more

External resources

There are a number of resources available to help the construction industry address the issue of worker fatigue.

Click for more

Examples of best practice

Click for more

Examples of best practice

The Scheme aims to improve the image of construction through sharing examples of best practice with the industry. Below are a number of examples of best practice that have been witnessed by our Scheme Monitors on their visits, or that have been submitted directly to the Hub by registered sites, companies, and suppliers.

Click for more

Case studies

Click for more

Case studies

The Scheme collaborated with a variety of contractors which are leading the way in tackling worker fatigue to produce case studies outlining their approaches to this issue.

Click for more

What can you do?

Despite the health and safety risks associated with fatigue, it is often an underestimated workplace hazard in construction. It is crucial that the construction industry takes responsibility for managing, controlling and most importantly, preventing worker fatigue.

Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS)

Site management should implement a Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS) to control fatigue. Having a formal procedure in place to manage fatigue is important considering construction work involves high risk activities, including hazardous work, working at height and operating heavy machinery and equipment. It is important to manage fatigue like any other workplace hazard through risk assessment and risk management.

Using a FRMS draws together protective and preventative measures to manage the risks posed by fatigue and to prevent fatigue-related errors from developing into more serious accidents and injuries.

The stages of a FRMS should include:

  • Assess the level of fatigue risk associated with shift patterns by collecting information on employee’s working hours and working schedules. This involves conducting a risk assessment that takes into account the hazards associated with fatigue.
  • Identify factors which may contribute to fatigue and establish how likely worker fatigue is and the potential risks of working while fatigued.
  • Control measures should be implemented to reduce fatigue, such controls might include shorter shifts, fewer consecutive shifts, additional breaks and reduced workloads.
  • Regularly review and assess the adequacy of control measures in reducing fatigue and to establish how effective these measures are in preventing fatigue.

Monitor workloads

Project completion overtakes the welfare of the workforce and contractors working on projects.”

– Anonymous response to the Scheme survey

One of the most effective ways to minimise fatigue is to ensure that operatives are not in the position of working to the point of exhaustion. The management of workloads is important in making sure that workers do not become overburdened or fatigued.

To prevent the onset of fatigue, site management should:

  • Avoid overloading operatives with too much work or place unrealistic expectations on the completion of tasks and deadlines. Stringent deadlines can compel operatives to work overtime or to overburden themselves with work, reducing productivity and increasing the risk of errors, accidents and injuries.
  • Schedule appropriate workloads according to the duration and intensity of the shift. When work is particularly demanding, consider reducing the duration of the shift to prevent fatigue.
  • Vary each operative’s tasks and activities to avoid extended periods of physically demanding, highly focused or repetitive work.
  • Avoid scheduling demanding, dangerous or monotonous tasks during the night, early morning or towards the end of long shifts. These times of the day are when people feel the most tired.
  • Provide working environments that have good lighting and visibility. Uncomfortable temperatures and excessive noise and vibration can increase the risk of fatigue.
  • Provide operatives with equipment which reduces physical strain and manual labour, such as exoskeletons and electric wheelbarrows.

In addition to managing workloads, site management should recognise the impact of commuting to work and back. Often, operatives will travel a number of hours to work and back, provoking the onset of fatigue. Site management should monitor their employee’s commutes and adjust working hours and the intensity of workloads if an operative has a long commute.

Driver fatigue

“I believe the main cause of fatigue is the travelling to and from jobs. Roads and public transport are now so busy people are getting up earlier and earlier just to get to work on time.”

– Anonymous response to the Scheme survey

Driver fatigue is a serious issue which results in thousands of severe injuries, deaths and accidents on UK roads. In fact, research has found that 1 in 6 crashes resulting in death or injury are fatigue-related. Many construction workers are at risk of being too exhausted to drive. It is important that site management ensures operatives are safe when they are behind the wheel.

To mitigate driver fatigue, site management should:

  • Ensure operatives get enough sleep before driving and encourage workers to take a break at least every 2 hours while driving.
  • Make sure operatives are aware of the early warning signs and symptoms of driver fatigue.
  • Adjust working hours and workloads to take into account the amount of time spent commuting to and from work.
  • Educate workers on the importance of getting sufficient rest before getting behind the wheel.
  • Be mindful of operatives who routinely travel long distances as they will be susceptible to fatigue.

Control working hours

“I have worked night shifts in a previous contract which led to some of my decision making being affected and meaning I was not the best I could be due to worker fatigue. Not every person can do irregular shift patterns. I don’t believe this is considered in the workplace.”

– Anonymous response to the Scheme survey

Site management should be mindful of the impact certain working hours can have on operatives. This includes early starts, night work, overtime, long working hours and consecutive shifts. These shift patterns can increase the risk of fatigue and limit the time an operative has to physically and mentally recover.

To avoid provoking worker fatigue, site management should:

  • Avoid scheduling shifts that do not allow for at least 12 hours rest and try to ensure that shift patterns provide a continuous 7-8 hours sleep in each 24 hours, and at least 50 hours in every 7 days.
  • Avoid scheduling shifts which are longer than 8 hours. Long working hours can provoke fatigue and reduce the time available for leisure, sleep and relaxation. In fact, research has found that working for 12 hours increases the risk of injury by 25-30%.
  • Avoid planning early starts and night work where possible as these shifts give operatives considerably less time to sleep and recover, causing fatigue.
  • If it is unavoidable to adjust shift patterns, monitor and record the hours each operative has worked to prevent fatigue and to ensure no operative is working excessive hours.
  • If overtime is necessary, plan for this in advance so operatives can schedule in time for rest, recovery and leisure.

Breaks and rest periods

Site management should allow operatives to have regular breaks. Frequent, short breaks can reduce the risk of fatigue, improve productivity and performance, and enhance concentration, all of which can significantly reduce the risk of errors, accidents and injuries.

To improve productivity in the workplace, site management should:

  • Consider allowing additional breaks if there are signs of fatigue amongst the workforce. Cognitively and physically demanding tasks will require more frequent breaks than less demanding activities.
  • Provide adequate welfare facilities for operatives to rest and relax in before going back to work.
  • Research has found that around 25% of workers are risking their health by refusing to take a break and one third of workers skip lunch to cope with their workloads. Encourage operatives to take their full break entitlement to prevent the onset of fatigue.

Signs of fatigue

Site management has a duty to assess the physical and cognitive signs of fatigue amongst the workforce. If site management believes an operative is displaying signs of fatigue, it is important to address this problem quickly. This is because operatives are often unaware that they are fatigued. Common symptoms of fatigue include falling asleep, long blinks, difficulty keeping eyes open, frequent yawning and staring blankly.

To monitor the signs of fatigue, site management could:

  • Be aware of the signs and symptoms of fatigue and understand what action to take if you think an operative is suffering from fatigue.
  • Supply operatives with wearable technologies such as wristbands and helmets, examples include Readibands and SmartCaps. These technologies have biometric sensors which can detect changes in physical movement, including facial, eye and bodily movements. This can help monitor signs of exhaustion and be used to warn operatives if they are reaching high levels of fatigue.
  • Encourage operatives to download smartphone applications such as Sleep Cycle, which tracks sleeping patterns to help workers monitor their own fatigue levels.
  • Install telematic systems in vehicles, plant and mobile machinery to detect signs of fatigue, including erratic steering and braking.
  • If you notice a worker is tired, do not allow the operative to commence work or continue working if they are fatigued to such an extent that their condition may prejudice their safety or the safety of others.

Educate the workforce

“This issue is rarely discussed, there should be regular discussions on it.”

– Anonymous response to the Scheme survey

Educating the workforce is essential for managing and mitigating fatigue. To prevent workers becoming exhausted, site management should teach operatives about the health and safety risks associated with fatigue.

To educate operatives about fatigue, site management could:

  • Display posters and leaflets on site and in welfare facilities to raise awareness about worker fatigue.
  • Educate operatives about the signs and symptoms associated with exhaustion to help workers identify when they might be too fatigued to work safely.
  • Host toolbox talks to educate operatives about the health and safety risks associated with fatigue. There needs to be recognition that both operatives and site management have a responsibility in managing fatigue.
  • Discuss the issue of worker fatigue during site briefings and site inductions to remind operatives about the dangers of working while fatigued before construction commences.
  • Educate operatives about the importance of sleep, rest and recovery, and the dangers of sleep deprivation. Ensure operatives are aware that insufficient sleep and being awake for long periods of time can significantly increase the risk of errors and accidents on site.

Workplace culture

“We are a ‘mans’ industry and men seldom say that they are tired as it would be seen as being a sign of weakness. We all need to look at ourselves and our mates around us and be honest.”

“It’s a hard subject to bring up to your peers and to accept you may be suffering from fatigue”

– Anonymous responses to the Scheme survey

Construction is a stereotypically masculine industry, imposing values of toughness and independence. This masculine culture can make operatives reluctant to admit they are fatigued and can deter them from voicing concerns about their health and wellbeing. It is important to ensure operatives feel supported by fostering a culture in which workers feel encouraged to discuss both personal and professional issues without fear of judgement or reprimand.

To promote a positive workplace culture, site management should:

  • Regularly consult with the workforce about shift patterns and workloads to ensure no operative is feeling overburdened. If an operative raises an issue, consider amending their working hours and workloads to reduce the risk of fatigue.
  • Encourage operatives to feedback their opinions on workloads and working schedules. If concerns are raised, assess the situation and if appropriate, put in place control measures such as additional breaks, job rotation, replacement personnel or extra supervision.
  • Implement a confidential reporting procedure for operatives to voice concerns about fatigue. This might encourage workers to discuss any worries they might have about their workload or shift patterns.
  • Support operatives in accessing advice, support and resources for managing fatigue and exhaustion.

However, it is important to remember that it is the responsibility of both the employer and employee in managing fatigue. Operatives have a duty to communicate with site management if they start displaying signs of fatigue and raise concerns if they are feeling more tired than usual, particularly if there have been changes in their personal life, shift patterns or workload.

Health and wellbeing

Although it is clear that work-related factors play a significant role in contributing to exhaustion, feelings of fatigue can be exacerbated by an individual’s lifestyle choices.

To reduce the risk of fatigue, site management should:

  • Encourage operatives to live a healthy lifestyle by promoting exercise, getting enough sleep, eating a healthy diet, avoiding stimulants such as caffeine, nicotine, drugs and alcohol, and staying hydrated. This will allow operatives to make informed decisions about their lifestyle choices.
  • Invite a health professional on site to carry out health assessments, to educate operatives about the health risks associated with fatigue and the symptoms of exhaustion to look out for.
  • Host warm-up exercises before construction work commences to boost energy levels. Exercise and physical activity improves fitness, health and wellbeing and reduces stress.
  • Encourage operatives to seek medical advice if they are concerned about their health and wellbeing or if signs of fatigue persist.
  • Provide operatives with guidance and advice for getting good quality sleep. Sleep plays an important role in managing fatigue, and sleep deficit can have a profound impact on an individual’s ability to work safely and productively.
  • Signpost operatives towards information and resources that will help them to make lifestyle choices which will improve their health and wellbeing.

Remember that site management does not have the sole responsibility in managing fatigue. Operatives should take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing to ensure they are fit for work.


This campaign has shown that the construction industry is making considerable progress towards tackling the issue of worker fatigue. However, the industry must continue to raise awareness about the health and safety risks associated with fatigue to safeguard the health and wellbeing of everyone working in construction.

Alongside the information above, it is also advised to use the resources provided in the ‘External resources’ section of the campaign which identifies valuable information from other organisations.

The Scheme will continue to update this campaign as new case studies and examples of best practice emerge. If you would like to share how you are addressing the issue of worker fatigue, please contact the Best Practice Hub team by emailing: enquiries@ccsbestpractice.org.uk

 

Navigational menu
Close menu

Campaign sections

More on... Spotlight on… worker fatigue

Close examples of best practice

Examples of best practice

The Scheme aims to improve the image of construction through sharing examples of best practice with the industry. Below are a number of examples of best practice that have been witnessed by our Scheme Monitors on their visits, or that have been submitted directly to the Hub by registered sites, companies, and suppliers.

Mindfulness: Mediation and Meditation

Published 5 August 2019 | One comment
Written by Rachel Rielly
Categories Mental health Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesMental health Stress Worker fatigue

On The Broadway project, we are focusing on the wellbeing of all Multiplex staff and contractors working on our behalf. We have collectively been thinking of new ways to help manage stress and in doing so have took to mindfulness and how it can help in the workplace. We invited a guest speaker to help us learn meditation techniques as…

Pink Wall in Canteen

Published 5 August 2019 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Canteen Initiatives Reporting Worker fatigue
CategoriesCanteen Initiatives Reporting Worker fatigue

Our Health & Safety team at Overbury have surveyed our workforce and identified that the male-dominated environment of construction sites can sometimes lead to poor decision making and refusing to take breaks due to tiredness. We sought advice from a behavioural specialist who suggested that painting the canteen wall pink would challenge this mindset and reduce stress hormones (much like…

Becoming Fatigue Free Project: BAM Nuttall London City Airport

Published 29 July 2019 | No comments
Written by Anna Mason
Categories Healthy lifestyle advice Worker fatigue
CategoriesHealthy lifestyle advice Worker fatigue

The Healthy Employee is working with BAM Nuttall London City CADP Piling and Deck Works on the Becoming Fatigue Free Project. The focus is on diet, exercise, sleep and lifestyle improvements. As part of this project the workforce, benefited from sampling healthy snacks and water from the Food Tasting Table and Hydration Station. Although this project is in it’s infancy,…

EKSO ZeroG System

Published 22 July 2019 | No comments
Written by Alan Jones
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

The site has introduced the  which uses EKSO ZeroG System technology to help ease the burden of regularly handling tools and equipment. The design of the product allows it to be fitted onto existing scaffold handrails or the handrails of mobile elevated working platforms and uses harness straps to attach a variety of tools. Benefits include taking the weight of…

Fatigue Monitoring System

Published 24 June 2019 | No comments
Written by Kevin Roodt
Categories Mental health Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesMental health Occupational health risks Worker fatigue

Considering the importance that the HSE places on fatigue and working excessive, along with our focus on Mental health, we decided to have Datascope create a way in which to record and clearly indicate the number of hours worked per operative per week. A report is then automatically created and sent to the Goodmans Fields management team to review on…

Geotechnical Pallet Lifters

Published 17 June 2019 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue Working methods
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue Working methods

An idea that a CAN Site Manager came up with when working on other projects was a spring loaded pallet lifter to try and reduce manual handling for operatives when working with our grout plants. In principle, it was a pretty simple but very effective piece of kit that was manufactured for the Scarborough project. When a 1.5 ton pallet…

Fatigue

Published 21 May 2019 | No comments
Written by andrea lilly
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

Pacy & Wheatley have just introduced information to their staff in relation to the issue of fatigue. This shall be added as an extension to their “Look After Yourself” board on all sites and includes the following: Stay alert on site – fatigue can kill (visual dipicting construction workers potentially at risk) and tips to avoid fatigue Pacy & Wheatley…

Mobile Site Accommodation

Published 29 April 2019 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Canteen Changing Recreation Rest Separate facilities Showers Worker fatigue
CategoriesCanteen Changing Recreation Rest Separate facilities Showers Worker fatigue

Mid 2018 saw GBM Demolition make the business decision to design and build a series of transportable site accommodation trailers. Each one features separate sleeping accommodation for up to five people, complete with TV, heating and individual en-suite bathrooms with showers, as well as a shared fully operational kitchen and mess facility. Each unit comes to site with the access…

Onsite Drivers’ Rest Station

Published 25 March 2019 | No comments
Written by Deborah Madden
Categories Driver information Recreation Rest Worker fatigue
CategoriesDriver information Recreation Rest Worker fatigue

We recognised that drivers within our supply chain were taking their breaks in vehicles which is not ideal! As we have enforced zero idling on our site, we decided to make a change by offering somewhere to relax while taking breaks or waiting for unloading. This has undoubtedly had a positive impact in the direct environment of the site, as…

Electric Wheelbarrows

Published 25 February 2019 | No comments
Written by Pedro Flores
Categories Carbon footprint reporting Noise Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesCarbon footprint reporting Noise Occupational health risks Worker fatigue

Recently on one of our sites, operatives were challenged by the difficulties in renovating a historic Grade II listed building in London City Centre. The project had various environmental requirements that needed to be met, such as noise restrictions and air quality standards. Nevertheless one of the most challenging adversities was the size of the site, which required operatives to…

Self-Help and Wellbeing Resource Board

Published 10 December 2018 | No comments
Written by Kurt Williams
Categories Drugs and alcohol policy E-smoking Healthy lifestyle advice Mental health Notice board Posters Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesDrugs and alcohol policy E-smoking Healthy lifestyle advice Mental health Notice board Posters Stress Worker fatigue

We have developed a resource board that offers practical advice and and contact information for the following issues: Mental Health Smoking Alcohol and Drugs Debt Healthy Eating Stress Exercise The board is a one stop shop designed for those that are reluctant to ask for help, giving them the option to help themselves. The board is displayed in the site…

New App Launched to Support Construction Workers’ Mental Health

Published 10 December 2018 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Consultants Guidance Guidance Mental health Programming Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesConsultants Guidance Guidance Mental health Programming Stress Worker fatigue

The Lighthouse Club Construction Industry Charity, who run the Construction Industry Helpline, launched a new app on the 7th December 2018 in collaboration with COINS (a construction software firm) and Building Mental Health (an online information portal about mental health, also developed by the charity). The new Construction Industry Helpline app will be a free, confidential service aimed at providing…

Off road holding area collaboration

Published 17 October 2018 | No comments
Written by Michael Barratt MBE
Categories CLOCS Initiatives Traffic management Unloading Worker fatigue
CategoriesCLOCS Initiatives Traffic management Unloading Worker fatigue

In 2015, 107 pedal cyclists and 186 pedestrians were killed or seriously injured on British roads in accidents involving at least one HGV. HGVs were involved in 25% of pedestrian fatalities and almost 60% of cyclist fatalities. According to the European Transport Safety Council (2001), indications have shown that driver fatigue is a contributing factor in approximately 20% of HGV…

Gripping Hand Tool for Lifting

Published 24 May 2018 | No comments
Written by Stephane Hossard
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

At Pontoon Dock site, we constantly try to improve the wellbeing of our workforce. We believe that we have the obligation to provide our construction workers the highest standards in terms of working conditions. Using new tools, we can make their jobs easier and preserve their health. It is an investment in the long term and a win-win situation. The…

Andon App to Monitor Productivity

Published 16 May 2018 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Communicate initiatives Incident procedures Worker fatigue
CategoriesCommunicate initiatives Incident procedures Worker fatigue

Sites should seek to maximise efficiency while minimising any waste or pollution as a result of construction work. See the examples below for how one site addressed this: The site team began using a new internal workplace app called Andon, which tracks and monitors productivity and location of gangs on site in real time. Using this app allows the office…

Electronic GRAHAM Wellbeing Hub

Published 16 May 2018 | No comments
Written by Caroline Gee
Categories Healthy lifestyle advice Intranet Mental health Worker fatigue
CategoriesHealthy lifestyle advice Intranet Mental health Worker fatigue

GRAHAM have developed an online portal to manage their wellbeing programme more effectively, allowing employees to self-manage diagnostics, appointments and gain access to additional wellbeing support resources including videos on wellbeing subjects and access to national and local wellbeing services. Accessible through the intranet for staff and employees the GRAHAM Wellbeing Hub promotes key wellbeing messages to everyone, from the…

Phone Home Room

Published 14 May 2018 | No comments
Written by Nyron Higgins
Categories Mental health Phone Recreation Rest Stress Wi-Fi
CategoriesMental health Phone Recreation Rest Stress Wi-Fi

Mount Anvil has introduced a room on all our sites with Free WiFi and a tablet if needed, to enable the workforce to contact their family whilst at work. This is to help combat stress and mental health issues related to those who work away from home and have minimal contact with their loved ones. These rooms have proved a…

Human Behaviour and Safety

Published 9 April 2018 | No comments
Written by Mark Harriman
Categories Stress Worker fatigue Workforce consultation
CategoriesStress Worker fatigue Workforce consultation

Tarmac’s maintenance contract for Walsall Council entered into a study along with Emily Kitson of Surrey Business School. The study was to understand how stress can affect a person’s safety while at work. The outcome has been to feed this information back to our HR teams to be included for future recruitment tests, and also so that HR understand that…

On-site rest stop for delivery drivers and driver fatigue brochure

Published 26 March 2018 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Behaviour Driver information Showers Toilets Worker fatigue Workforce information
CategoriesBehaviour Driver information Showers Toilets Worker fatigue Workforce information

1 in 5 driver deaths in Ireland can be attributed to driver fatigue. Sites should consider the wellbeing of all drivers connected to the site and ensure they are well-rested to minimise the risk of road accidents. See the examples below for how one site achieved this: In response to the realisation that on either side of the site motorway,…

Safe Distribution of Internal Doors

Published 12 March 2018 | No comments
Written by Oliver Richards
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

Loading out doors across a large building often provides major manual handling challenges. Carrying doors across even wide open areas is often a labour intensive operation. To reduce and control the risk of manual handling issues when loading out doors, a door trolley system has been employed. This purpose made trolley has hooks and strap points which enables the load…

Hi-Viz Jacket with Drinks Bottle

Published 26 January 2018 | No comments
Written by john fryer
Categories Plastics and packaging PPE Weather protection Worker fatigue
CategoriesPlastics and packaging PPE Weather protection Worker fatigue

We have added a ‘Camelbak’ drinks bottle in the rear of the hi-viz for operatives so that they do not have to walk around the site looking for hydration. This is especially useful for traffic marshals who are on the go, who can quickly hydrate in the summer months, reducing the need for plastic bottles which are becoming a major problem…

Elevated Desks for Staff Wellbeing

Published 9 January 2018 | No comments
Written by Darren Peck
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

In the site office, elevation desks were procured to ensure that it is possible for employees to work standing up for periods of the day. The benefits of this include increased well being, flexibility for employees to adjust desk height individually and to work standing up. This will improve health in terms of reduced muscle pain from working in uncomfortable…

Readiband Technology for Fatigue

Published 9 January 2018 | No comments
Written by Natalie Swan
Categories Health screening Worker fatigue
CategoriesHealth screening Worker fatigue

The health, safety and wellbeing of the BBMV workforce is of vital importance. BBMV at the Crossrail Whitechapel project worked in partnership with Fatigue Science Limited, as a part of a pilot to help enhance wellbeing in the workplace by looking at a sleep patterns in a sample of the workforce across all roles and shift patterns. The pilot combined…

Integral Development Coaching and Wellbeing Initiatives

Published 5 January 2018 | No comments
Written by Darren Peck
Categories Healthy lifestyle advice Mental health Stress
CategoriesHealthy lifestyle advice Mental health Stress

The Mace team at Grosvenor Crescent utilised a staff member who had privately certified as an Integral Development Coach. This staff member regularly provided advice and support to the whole project team via: One to one sessions Informal advice Group sessions A programme of Wellbeing initiatives have been implemented on the project including: November’s “Move for Movember” campaign with £4,000…

Wellbeing Questionnaire

Published 5 January 2018 | No comments
Written by Darren Peck
Categories Feedback/questionnaires Health screening
CategoriesFeedback/questionnaires Health screening

The Mace team at Grosvenor Crescent attempted to quantify wellbeing statistically. A wellbeing questionnaire was created. This questionnaire is used by the NHS to test Wellbeing in the UK and was created by the University of Warwick Medical School (Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS)). The questionnaire involves 14 Questions with five response options available per question. Each response option generates…

Increasing the Standards of the Working Environment

Published 2 January 2018 | No comments
Written by Ushna Mughal
Categories Canteen Recreation Rest Worker fatigue
CategoriesCanteen Recreation Rest Worker fatigue

The Greenwich Peninsula Upper Riverside welfare facilities have been designed to improve the standards and working environment on construction sites. Mace directors analysed a number of studies which show a correlation between the influence of working environment and staff productivity. This included examples from Google and Microsoft offices. This allowed the Mace team to identify measures that could be implemented…

Reduced manual handling from using plasterboard

Published 21 November 2017 | No comments
Written by Gavin Thomas
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

To reduce the transportation of and minimise manual handling as a result of moving plasterboard we have used a plasterboard trolley which we believe is the best way to transport this product. This manual handling aid will help to reduce fatigue of our workforce as well as saving time throughout the project.

Kerb grab to reduce manual handling

Published 21 November 2017 | No comments
Written by Gavin Thomas
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

We now use a kerb grab system on our sites. This system can either attach to an excavator or be utilised by a lifting aid for two people. These kerb grab devices greatly reduce the need for manual handling, which is good for the health and wellbeing of our workforce.

Manual Adjustment of Doors Reduced

Published 7 November 2017 | No comments
Written by Gavin Thomas
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

During a site fit-out of many doors split between heavy timber door sets and awkwardly shaped external metal doors, we look at ways of eliminating and reducing the manual adjustment of these doors to help the workforce. We found that the best product on the market was a hand pumped “Winbag” which is a little cushion that can be pumped…

Ecospot Boards

Published 9 October 2017 | No comments
Written by Dawn Smith
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

During bricklaying activities, there is a high risk of musculoskeletal injuries, due to the repetitive bending required to retrieve mortar from the mortar boards. The Ecospot is a bracket and mortar board that attaches to any standard scaffolding. It can be adjusted to suit any height that is comfortable for each individual bricklayer. These are currently in use on Mace’s…

SmartCap Fatigue Management

Published 6 October 2017 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Health screening PPE Reporting Worker fatigue
CategoriesHealth screening PPE Reporting Worker fatigue

Fatigue is a serious problem among truck drivers and heavy machine operators as it can minimise operatives’ awareness and endanger the safety of all on site. Steps should be taken to monitor and manage operative fatigue. See the examples below for how one site addressed this: Used the SmartCap fatigue management system to manage the performance and safety of personnel….

Fatigue Reduction Technology

Published 24 July 2017 | No comments
Written by Mark Dixon
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

Workplace operative comfort is a high priority for Westleigh, this is coupled with safety as it can affect tiredness during long process activities. Our sister company Westframe, who provide all our timber frame requirements, have recently improved and added to the measures taken to ensure our workforce are comfortable at work. All work stations at the factory have benefited from…

Goody Box

Published 8 June 2017 | No comments
Written by Angela Ciorba
Categories Benefits Recognition Reward Weather protection Worker fatigue
CategoriesBenefits Recognition Reward Weather protection Worker fatigue

To show how much we care about and appreciate our workforce, Ciorba Construction Ltd is happy to introduce the “Goody Box”. This goody box contains a number of daily essentials just in case they need it including: travel-size toothbrushes toothpaste antiperspirant hand sanitisers dental floss SPF skin and lip protection cream/ balm (for summer months) lifting belt heel protection shoe inserts to…

Relaxation ‘Taster’ Sessions

Published 19 May 2017 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Recreation Rest Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesRecreation Rest Stress Worker fatigue

Sites must take appropriate steps to ensure the health and wellbeing of the workforce. Wellbeing initiatives foster positive mental health and make for a more productive workforce. See the examples below detailing the initiative developed by one site: Site management thought about what they as individuals do to relax and de-stress when they are at home. Each member of staff then developed…

Beating the Mental Health Stigma

Published 12 May 2017 | No comments
Written by Fiona Power
Categories Mental health Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesMental health Stress Worker fatigue

The project has identified mental health as a key focus for 2017. To kick off the year in a positive light, presentations on mental health awareness were delivered to the workforce as part of our safe start following the Christmas period. The presentation reiterated how to identify the symptoms of stress and fatigue and how to foster positive mental health. Following…

Relaxation Room

Published 27 April 2017 | No comments
Written by Colin Draper
Categories Rest Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesRest Stress Worker fatigue

In 2014/15 the top work related illnesses were to do with stress, depression and anxiety, and work related pressures are often a cause or major contributor. Site management roles are often highly stressed with a high sickness rate compared to other roles. It is widely accepted that rather than a short-term knee jerk reaction to health, looking at employee’s long-term…

Fatigue Wristband for Tunnelling Workforce

Published 2 February 2017 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Consultants Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesConsultants Occupational health risks Worker fatigue

Worker fatigue poses a potential health and safety hazard, and can be detrimental to the overall health of the workforce. Fatigue can have similar effects to alcohol, slowing down reaction time, causing lapses in judgement, and impairing cognitive ability. This danger is particularly relevant to projects which involve tunnelling, as the long shifts and rotating day and night shifts put workers at greater…

Stress and Resilience Guidance

Published 9 December 2016 | No comments
Written by Tom Horton
Categories Guidance Guidance Management attitudes Stress Worker fatigue
CategoriesGuidance Guidance Management attitudes Stress Worker fatigue

During periods of change and high demand, the Costain Skanska Joint Venture building Crossrail’s Paddington Station require their staff to be resilient and proactive about maintaining their wellbeing. The workplace has a duty of care to provide an environment that not only creates formal opportunities for wellbeing discussions, but actively encourages managers to discuss levels of stress and resilience with…

10 Top Tips for Night Workers

Published 29 November 2016 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Healthy lifestyle advice Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesHealthy lifestyle advice Occupational health risks Worker fatigue

When you’re working a shift schedule, your eating and exercise habits can suffer. People who work shifts sometimes skip meals, eat irregularly, eat unhealthy convenience food, and may find it hard to keep up a regular exercise schedule. Shift workers are at higher risk for weight gain and heart disease as a result. Healthy eating and exercise help improve your…

Optima-Life

Published 3 August 2016 | No comments
Written by Cathal Ward
Categories Consultation Health screening Healthy lifestyle advice
CategoriesConsultation Health screening Healthy lifestyle advice

Optima-life works with organisations that are committed to a long-term strategy for their people. Their objective is to provide a service that will ultimately benefit the health and well being of those taking part. The scheme works on a six stage level; Stage 1: An in-depth online questionnaire is distributed to those in the scheme, this monitors Psychology, Productivity, Physiology and…

Recreation and Prayer Room

Published 27 June 2016 | No comments
Written by Michael Turlin
Categories Benefits Cultural needs Recreation Religious considerations Rest Separate facilities Stress Weather protection Worker fatigue
CategoriesBenefits Cultural needs Recreation Religious considerations Rest Separate facilities Stress Weather protection Worker fatigue

At Bellway, we have shown we care for our staff by installing a recreation room with surround sound TV/ DVD, seating and also heating. This is to help any of our workforce that feel stressed or just need some space away from the site for a few moments. We have also layed carpet on the floor to allow religious operatives the opportunity…

Ensuring safe driving to and from work

Published 17 May 2016 | No comments
Written by Thomas Housecroft
Categories Driver information Posters Roads Worker fatigue
CategoriesDriver information Posters Roads Worker fatigue

Maintaining the wellbeing and safety of your workforce should always be prioritised even on the journey to and from site. To help raise awareness and improve employees’ safety, our site has The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) safe journey planner on display at the main entrance for all site staff to read, as well as having copies available in…

Fatigued Feet

Published 14 April 2016 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Occupational health risks Worker fatigue
CategoriesOccupational health risks Worker fatigue

Maintaining awareness of the workforce’s health and wellbeing is important in maintaining a happy site. Health and safety risks may not always come in the form of an immediate hazard. Physical and psychological long-term effects are also risks and should be treated with the same level of monitoring and consideration. One site demonstrated their caring nature in response to the…

How can worker fatigue be managed?

Published 4 February 2016 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Rest Worker fatigue
CategoriesRest Worker fatigue

Worker fatigue should be acknowledged as a serious concern to health and wellbeing. A summary of what exactly worker fatigue is and the effects can be found here. Alike to all safety hazards on a construction site, worker fatigue and the risks associated with it not only effect the individual, but also those around them. The Causes Some of the…

What is Worker Fatigue?

Published 3 February 2016 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Rest Worker fatigue
CategoriesRest Worker fatigue

The safety and wellbeing of a site’s workforce is a primary concern and must be properly monitored and managed. Amongst other common safety hazards, worker fatigue should not be something that is overlooked. “A state of perceived weariness that can result from prolonged working, heavy workload, insufficient rest and inadequate sleep.” – Office of Rail Regulation 2012 The Effects A construction…

Minimising Worker Fatigue by Providing Shoe Insoles

Published 21 September 2015 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Worker fatigue
CategoriesWorker fatigue

Construction work is often tiring and demanding on operatives physical wellbeing. The importance of healthy and comfortable feet is often overlooked; issues with the feet often develop into more serious problems such as backaches, headaches and knee problems. It is important to identify these problems and develop methods to minimise them. Below is an example of how sites have introduced insoles…

Recognising and Addressing the Issue of Worker Fatigue

Published 30 June 2015 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Rest Worker fatigue
CategoriesRest Worker fatigue

It is essential that the health and wellbeing of your workforce is taken into consideration and that your workers feel valued and well looked after. Site management should identify potential aspects that may negatively impact employees wellbeing or their ability to effectively perform tasks and implement measures to offset these. Below is an example of how a site ensured the wellbeing…

Technology to Monitor Welfare Management

Published 26 May 2015 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Worker fatigue
CategoriesWorker fatigue

Every site should care for the health and wellbeing of the workforce. Sites should be aware of safety risks, work/ life balance and potential worker fatigue. It is in the best interest of the workforce to appropriately monitor safety aspects, to offset any potential hazards that may arise. Below is an example of a system that facilitates this: The ‘DataScope’…

Protecting Operatives from Heat Fatigue

Published 12 May 2015 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Weather protection Worker fatigue
CategoriesWeather protection Worker fatigue

Workers often face difficult working environments due to the various weather conditions in which they have to work. Consideration should be given to the conditions facing operatives and the measures that can be developed and implemented to counteract the impact of these environments. Such measures are vital to ensure the wellbeing of your workforce, and to offer the best protection during extreme weather…

Minimising Worker Fatigue

Published 30 October 2014 | No comments
Written by CCS Best Practice Hub Administrator
Categories Worker fatigue
CategoriesWorker fatigue

Worker fatigue and sleep deprivation can be potentially dangerous for the worker, other members of the workforce and the general public. Long working hours can cause fatigue and this has been linked to accidents on site. Examples of how site managers have helped to minimise worker fatigue include: Sites have developed a ‘Make it happen’ approach, which reported proactive activities and introduced them to…

Close case studies

Case studies

The Scheme collaborated with a variety of contractors which are leading the way in tackling worker fatigue to produce case studies outlining their approaches to this issue.

Contractors

A-one+ describes how it has devised a fatigue management plan, policies and preventative measures to prevent fatigue and to safeguard the health and wellbeing of all operatives on site. Read the case study here.
Bouygues explains how they have incorporated worker fatigue into their overall health and safety initiative and the measures that they have implemented to reduce fatigue within their workforce. Read the case study here.
Carnell Group explains how it is raising awareness of worker fatigue and the impact sleep deprivation can have on an individual’s health, safety and welfare. Read the case study here.
Farrans discusses how it is taking responsibility for protecting the health and safety of its employees by assessing, monitoring and reviewing workloads and working hours. Read the case study here.
J. Murphy & Sons Ltd outlines its commitment to managing and monitoring workloads and shift patterns to prevent the onset of fatigue amongst the workforce. Read the case study here.
Morgan Sindall reveals how it has monitored fatigue within its workforce and used the results to update its fatigue management strategies. Read the case study here.
Munnelly Support Services has developed Fatigue360, a fatigue management system which aims to help employers monitor and mitigate the onset and impact of worker fatigue. Read the case study here.
Northern Gas Networks explain the initiatives that they have developed to support its workforce so they are able to work safely during times of high demand. Read the case study here.
Robertson presents its comprehensive fatigue management procedure which aims to prevent and manage the health and safety risks associated with worker fatigue. Read the case study here.
VolkerRail details how it is addressing the issue of worker fatigue through implementing a number of effective policies, regulations, initiatives and control measures. Read the case study here.
Close law and legislation

Law and legislation

The following legislation establishes polices and regulations which have been put in place to prevent worker fatigue.

The Health and Safety at Work Act (1974)

Under this Act, employers have a legal duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of employees and those that may be affected by their work. Sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Act place general duties on employers to reduce health and safety risks, including risks posed by fatigue, so far as reasonably practicable.

Similarly, under this legislation, employees are expected to cooperate with their employer by ensuring they are rested enough to perform their work safely and reporting any concerns about fatigue to their employer.

The Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations (1996)

Under these regulations, employers are required to consult with their workforce on health and safety issues, including fatigue. Consultation involves employers providing employees with information and listening to their opinions before making a decision. If a decision regarding changes to working hours or shift patterns is raised, the employer must consult with the employee before implementing any new changes.

The Working Time Regulations (1998)

These regulations establish the minimum legal requirements on how to organise working time. Employers are required to satisfy the provisions and consider fatigue as a risk factor in their business like any other health and safety risk. Whether the business involves major hazards or not, employers are required to set up appropriate systems to control potential causes of fatigue, including working hours, shift patterns, overtime, annual leave and rest periods.

However, it is important for employers to remember that compliance with these regulations is not in itself sufficient to control risks posed by fatigue. The employer must ensure they are aware of the hours an employee works and takes appropriate action to prevent any risks to workers.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999)

These regulations are the main instrument for risk assessments and risk management to control health and safety hazards, including fatigue. Under these regulations, employers are required to make an assessment of the risks posed by fatigue and introduce effective measures to remove or control such risks where possible. This includes monitoring, reviewing and assessing the number of hours worked and how these hours are scheduled.

Close External resources

External resources

There are a number of resources available to help the construction industry address the issue of worker fatigue.

Organisations

  • Active Training Team are an industry-leading provider of health and safety workshops and training days. They have released a podcast in which specialist academics and professionals discuss the risks of worker fatigue.
  • Brake is a road safety charity which aims to stop road deaths and injuries from occurring. The charity raises awareness of the dangers of driving while fatigued and has developed a number of initiatives to prevent the onset of driver fatigue.
  • Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) is a charity which strives to improve mental health. The charity provides frontline services, including a free helpline and webchat to help people to discuss a range of problems, including work-related issues such as stress and burnout.
  • Fatigue and Risk Index (FRI) is an online resource developed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to help organisations to assess the risks of fatigue in the workplace.
  • Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is a UK government agency responsible for the encouragement, enforcement and regulation of occupational health and safety. HSE raises awareness of fatigue and provides a number of resources to help organisations to manage fatigue in the workplace.
  • Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) is part of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and educates organisations about the impact and causes of fatigue and how risks posed by fatigue can be effectively managed.
  • Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) is a leading health and safety organisation which is committed to ensuring that working practices are safe. The organisation provides guidance on how working hours should be designed, managed and monitored to make sure employees do not become fatigued.
  • International Labour Organization (ILO) is a United Nations agency which brings together governments, employers, and workers to set standards and promote safe working practices. The organisation also raises awareness of the issue of worker fatigue and the importance of appropriate working hours.
  • National Health Service (NHS) is the UK’s overarching healthcare service which offers guidance for tackling a number of physical and mental health issues. The NHS delivers advice for tackling fatigue and getting good quality sleep through providing self-help tips and support.
  • Public Health England is an executive agency of the Department of Health and Social Care. The organisation raises awareness of the dangers of sleep deprivation and the importance of preventing fatigue in the workplace.
  • SafeTea Break is an online resource developed by 3M. The toolkit aims to help organisations educate their workforce about a number of health and safety risks, including worker fatigue.
  • Sleep and Recovery Toolkit is an online resource launched by Business in the Community (BITC) in partnership with Public Health England. The toolkit offers organisations advice and support for addressing fatigue and sleep deprivation.
  • The Healthy Employee is an organisation which aims to help employers to create safe, healthy and productive workplaces through providing a range of resources including toolkits, toolbox talks and workshops. The organisation is focusing on the issue of fatigue in its ‘Becoming a Fatigue Free Project’ initiative.
  • THINK! is a campaign launched by the Department of Transport which provides road safety information to help reduce the number of people killed or injured on roads in the UK. The campaign also raises awareness of the risks of driving while fatigued and the legal implications this can have.
  • Trade Union Congress (TUC) is a federation of trade unions across England and Wales. The federation developed a paper on the issue of worker fatigue which aims to raise awareness of fatigue, its causes and how it can be prevented.
  • Unite the Union is a British and Irish trade union which aims to protect worker’s rights. The union raises awareness of the dangers of long working hours and the impact this can have on an employee’s health, safety and wellbeing.

What is the industry doing?

  • CONSTRUCT is a member of Build UK and brings together common aims within the construction industry. CONSTRUCT released a paper raising awareness of the issue of fatigue in construction and provides advice for how to prevent fatigue in the workplace.
  • Constructing Better Health (CBH) is a not-for-profit scheme dedicated to improving occupational health and safety in the construction industry. The scheme offers guidance on how to spot the signs of fatigue and how to manage working hours to prevent workers becoming exhausted.
  • Construction Industry Helpline is a charity which provides a 24/7 safety net for all construction workers and their families in the UK and Ireland. The charity offers advice and support for a range of issues, including occupational health and wellbeing, financial problems and mental health.
  • Fatigue360 is a fatigue management system developed by Munnelly Support Services. The system aims to help the construction industry to monitor shift patterns and working hours and to mitigate the risks posed by worker fatigue.
  • Health in Construction Leadership Group is an organisation which aims to improve health and safety in the construction industry. The group raises awareness of the issue of fatigue and the impact exhaustion can have on a worker’s physical and mental wellbeing.
  • Network Rail Safety Central is an online resource created by Network Rail to promote health and safety. The resources include guidance and support on a range of health and safety issues in the rail industry, including worker fatigue.
  • Office of Rail and Road (ORR) is an independent regulator which evaluates the rail industry’s health and safety performance. The organisation offers guidance and information about worker fatigue, its causes and how fatigue should be managed.
  • Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) is an organisation which aims to keep railways safe. The organisation provides guidance and resources to help employers prevent worker fatigue and manage the risks posed by sleep deprivation.
  • Stop. Make a Change. is a campaign which aims to build a safer and healthier construction industry. The campaign provides support and resources for tackling fatigue and promotes the importance of protecting health and wellbeing.
  • Transport for London (TfL) is a government body responsible for the transport system in Greater London. The organisation raises awareness about the dangers of shift working and the health and safety risks associated with working while fatigued.
Other Spotlight on... campaigns